Apple’s Fitness Guru Opens Up About the Watch

An increasingly robust body of evidence suggests that even athletes need to be worried about movement. A recent study in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine found that “prolonged sedentary time was independently associated with deleterious health outcomes regardless of physical activity.” That’s because, as Blahnik says, you “can’t exercise your way out of sedentariness.”

Source: Apple’s Fitness Guru Opens Up About the Watch | Outside Online

Daring Fireball: Steve Jobs at WWDC 1997

The way to build a great anything — a product, a company, a book, a blog, an app, a service, a movie, anything — is not to obsess over not making mistakes. That leads to paralysis. Try to avoid mistakes, sure. But recognize that you’ll inevitably make some, and create a culture and work ethic where mistakes get identified and fixed.

Source: Daring Fireball: Steve Jobs at WWDC 1997

The damage here isn’t that a bunch of people need to figure out how to delete an album1 that they got for free and are now whining about. It’s that Apple did something inconsiderate, tone-deaf, and kinda creepy for the sake of a relatively unimportant marketing campaign, and they seemingly didn’t think it would be a problem.

The ultimate problem for Apple, Beats and any other media distributor is that people want to experience art for themselves. These marketers speak in terms of data, simplification, and “music discovery,” an asinine formalization of “turning on the radio.” It’s not about discovery, the “user experience,” or their “trust” in your brand: it’s about finding a way we can arrive at music, on our own terms, free of the hype, advertisements, PR chicanery, and editorial bias you’re offering. We’re not paying you to tell us what to like: we’re paying you to provide us an easy platform through which to navigate music. Shut up, and take our money.

Chris Ott (via newspeedwayboogie)

Love the sentiment, but don’t think it’s true for most people.