Nicki Bluhm’s Van Session Covers and the 1% Youtube Rule for Artists

creatorsfreedom:

What you’re seeing above is a great music video cover by Nicki Bluhm and the Gamblers of the Hall & Oates classic I Can’t Go For That. The band has been recording from the dashboard of its tour van for some months, presumably between traveling from show to show. These great performances have been dubbed the “Van Sessions,” have been posted to Youtube and nicely curated into a playlist here. If you’ve seen it before, you’re in good company: This video hit the Internets on March 23, 2012 and has steadily been racking up views thanks to posts on Reddit.com, shares among friends on Facebook, showing up on Buzzfeed, thedailywh.at, boingboing.net and isnichwahr.de, among many others. You can see these stats (if the uploader makes them available) from video’s Youtube analytics, the little bar graph button under the video.

The 1 % Rule of Youtube Music Videos

We’ve talked about it before, but by 2010 analytics, Youtube is the number one place people discover music online. If you’re an music artist and your music isn’t on Youtube, you’re making it hard for listeners / viewers to find you, and maybe even frustrating your fans. In our Nashville Rock Your Net workshops, we’ve talked about ways for artists to…

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Nicely done!

I’ve got half a mind to actually run this on my inbox. Somewhere in my personal archives, perhaps in storage are CDs with all of my backed-up email beginning in the 90s. Back then I was using Eudora. Kind of unbelievable that I archived all of that email. It would be awesome to import all of that into Gmail at some point so I don’t have to go hunting for it.

(via Relive and analyze your entire email archive | ExtremeTech)

blech:

feltron:

Simon Parker’s London Cycle Map

I’m having another of those moments where I feel like I’m the only person in the world who dislikes something. (To be clear: I dislike this map.)

I’ve cycled in London. Not as much as some people, but for a year or two that was how I commuted, three to five times a week. I also did a few longer rides, and got to try the hire scheme before I moved away. I want to see there be more cycling in London.

The problem is that this map doesn’t make it any easier. Instead, it abstracts away some complexity you need to understand (how to deal with one way systems, for example) and replaces it with other complexity which you don’t (what is R1 and how is it different from R1a?)

Remember, the Tube map can make compromises with geography because it is disconnected from the surface geography except at stations. By contrast, cyclists have to share the same messy, often medieval, street plan as everything else on the ground, and this map won’t show enough to let them do it. I’d much rather have the TfL/LCC cycling maps, large as they are, because they actually work. (I know. I used them.)

On the other hand, perhaps everyone is liking and reblogging this because it’s colourful and pretty. Call it a nice artwork if you like, but I don’t think it’s good design.