Daring Fireball: Steve Jobs at WWDC 1997

The way to build a great anything — a product, a company, a book, a blog, an app, a service, a movie, anything — is not to obsess over not making mistakes. That leads to paralysis. Try to avoid mistakes, sure. But recognize that you’ll inevitably make some, and create a culture and work ethic where mistakes get identified and fixed.

Source: Daring Fireball: Steve Jobs at WWDC 1997

Designers who can go deep in technology like a computer scientist, and who can also understand people like a social scientist, are the designers who can think and create at the scale of millions of users. They are the ones who can manage the shifting standards and technologies that seemingly change every week. They are the ones the world needs right now.

We used to have a map of a frontier that could be anything. The web isn’t young anymore, though. It’s settled. It’s been prospected and picked through. Increasingly, it feels like we decided to pave the wilderness, turn it into a suburb, and build a mall. And I hate this map of the web, because it only describes a fraction of what it is and what’s possible. We’ve taken an opportunity for connection and distorted it to commodify attention. That’s one of the sleaziest things you can do.

A screen doesn’t care what it shows any more than a sheet of paper cares what’s printed on it. Screens are aesthetically neutral, so the looks of things are not a part of their grain. Sorry, internet. If you want to make something look flat, go for it. There are plenty of reasons to do so. But you shouldn’t say you made things look a certain way because the screen cared one way or the other.

What Screens Want by Frank Chimero

Finally getting around to reading this gem from the end of last year.