a foo fighters review

Foo Fighters @ House of Blues (Anaheim, CA) 02.07.02

Within nineteen seconds, the show was sold out via the Internet. Dave Grohl even said something about it during the show. Seeing the Foo Fighters in a 500 person capacity venue is a treat. Sure, you could have seen them in a place that size several years ago, but this night was most definitely a privilege.

For the first time in quite some time, Foo Fighters were back on stage. Over the last several months they have been working on the follow-up to Nothing Left To Lose. Having just finished the album, it was immediately apparent that they were ready to rock the stage again.

Dave Grohl and company love to rock. You can’t help but feel it with every lyric recited, every chord played and every drum pounded. Grohl is one of the best frontmen in rock music. Whether it’s a crowd of 1000 or a crowd of 100,000, he plays to you and gives his heart. People respond to that, not to mention his mighty sense of humor.

The band debuted several new songs and if the live versions hold true to the studio tracks, the forthcoming album will please the fans, for sure. During their last encore of the evening, which included a ballad from the new album, which word has it, Queen’s Brian May added some tracks to, the audience was in complete awe. Additionally, Dave performed a crowd-pleasing solo, electric version of “Everlong.”

Clocking in at just around two hours, the show was nothing short of one of the best I have ever witnessed, not to mention proceeds went to a good cause. The concert was a benefit for the Musicians Assistance Program (M.A.P.), an organization that helps people in the music industry with drug and alcohol addiction. It was started by Buddy Arnold and Carole Fields in the early nineties and has since grown into an international organization.

a foo fighters review

Foo Fighters @ House of Blues (Anaheim, CA) 02.07.02

Within nineteen seconds, the show was sold out via the Internet. Dave Grohl even said something about it during the show. Seeing the Foo Fighters in a 500 person capacity venue is a treat. Sure, you could have seen them in a place that size several years ago, but this night was most definitely a privilege.

For the first time in quite some time, Foo Fighters were back on stage. Over the last several months they have been working on the follow-up to Nothing Left To Lose. Having just finished the album, it was immediately apparent that they were ready to rock the stage again.

Dave Grohl and company love to rock. You can’t help but feel it with every lyric recited, every chord played and every drum pounded. Grohl is one of the best frontmen in rock music. Whether it’s a crowd of 1000 or a crowd of 100,000, he plays to you and gives his heart. People respond to that, not to mention his mighty sense of humor.

The band debuted several new songs and if the live versions hold true to the studio tracks, the forthcoming album will please the fans, for sure. During their last encore of the evening, which included a ballad from the new album, which word has it, Queen’s Brian May added some tracks to, the audience was in complete awe. Additionally, Dave performed a crowd-pleasing solo, electric version of “Everlong.”

Clocking in at just around two hours, the show was nothing short of one of the best I have ever witnessed, not to mention proceeds went to a good cause. The concert was a benefit for the Musicians Assistance Program (M.A.P.), an organization that helps people in the music industry with drug and alcohol addiction. It was started by Buddy Arnold and Carole Fields in the early nineties and has since grown into an international organization.

Kiss Me

“The notion is if you’re going to welcome me with open arms, you also have to welcome me with open legs.”

Such wisdom from Gene Simmons. The fact that it all went down on NPR with Terry Gross is just awesome. I missed it and now I’ll have to go find it somewhere.

Oh, and feel free to discuss it amongst yourselves.

Kiss Me

“The notion is if you’re going to welcome me with open arms, you also have to welcome me with open legs.”

Such wisdom from Gene Simmons. The fact that it all went down on NPR with Terry Gross is just awesome. I missed it and now I’ll have to go find it somewhere.

Oh, and feel free to discuss it amongst yourselves.

I Hit Your Car

It all started a couple of years back. I dunno, maybe it was less than that. I was pulling into a parking space in the garage of the place where I was once employed. SMASH! I crashed into the next vehicle over. I was distracted. It was an honest mistake, but the damage was done, and very little of it was to my vehicle.

I was so disappointed in myself. I took great pride in the fact that I knew the exact dimensions of what I drove and could maneuver it accordingly. I could parallel park with two inches in front or behind without tapping either car. Clearly there were other variables at play here. There’s just no way that I could hit a parked vehicle [pretty damn hard] in a parking garage. I went through it over and over in my head. My jaw was on the steering wheel and I just stared at the damage.

I quickly looked to see if there were any witnesses. Obviously the passenger was a witness, but she could be trusted. I spotted another co-worker, who had observed my gorgeous parking job. “You did not just see that,” I commanded.

“No, but that was a damn fine parking job.”

I got out of my vehicle to survey the damage to the other. No license plate, and I could smell the new-car scent with all of its windows rolled up. After looking at it from as many angles as I could, I made two decisions:

1) I fucked the vehicle up real good.
2) I should do the right thing and put a note on the car saying something to the effect of, “I don’t know if you noticed, but your vehicle has been hit. I did it. I’m really sorry about it. Here’s my work number. Please call me when you get this.”

With my head bowed in shame and utter embarrassment I took the elevator to the office. I talked it over with a couple of co-workers to get their opinion.

“You did what?! Leave a note?! Are you crazy?!”

“That’s the right thing to do though. I mean if someone hit my car and didn’t leave a note I would be pretty pissed.”

“Yeah, but coooome on… Who gives a shit? Are you making enough money to pay for the damage? Are you making enough money for your insurance to go up? Think about these things very carefully and then go back down there and take the note OFF the vehicle.”

My co-worker had a good point, but before I took the note off the vehicle, I went to the parking office and told the parking manager what happened. If I wasnÌt going to leave a note, I would at least let the parking guy know what happened. It made sense at the time. The parking manager followed me to the site and said, “It’s not that bad. Let’s see whose vehicle it is.”

The building I worked in was in the middle of Beverly Hills. There were actor’s offices, talent agencies, modeling agencies, record companies and other Beverly Hills-type offices.

After some snooping with a flashlight the head of parking figured out who it belonged to. I removed the note and we went back to his office, looked up the owner’s name and he said, “Listen, this guy works for [name of company] and probably pulls in some bucks. I would just let it go. I’m not going to tell on you or anything.”

There had to be a catch. I looked at him for a few seconds, in silence, digesting what I just heard. He just smiled. Did he want money?

“What do I owe you?”

“Nothing. Don’t worry about it.”

“You’re sure?”

“Yeah.”

And I was out the door, note in-hand and back at my desk with nothing to worry about.

Flash forward to last Saturday. I parked my vehicle at a meter and ran across the street to grab some reading material at the newsstand and some dinner next door. I read my material and ate my dinner. I went back to my vehicle and noticed something was amiss. Someone had sideswiped my vehicle. No body damage, but certainly enough to notice. They didn’t bother leaving a note.

I felt vulnerable, violated and pissed as hell. How could someone sideswipe my vehicle and not leave a note? What an asshole! I stared at the damage, touched it and blurted out a few more kind words to the wind. I got in and on my way home I was reminded of the time I hit that person’s vehicle and didn’t leave a note. I felt kinda silly and laughed. Of course.

I Hit Your Car

It all started a couple of years back. I dunno, maybe it was less than that. I was pulling into a parking space in the garage of the place where I was once employed. SMASH! I crashed into the next vehicle over. I was distracted. It was an honest mistake, but the damage was done, and very little of it was to my vehicle.

I was so disappointed in myself. I took great pride in the fact that I knew the exact dimensions of what I drove and could maneuver it accordingly. I could parallel park with two inches in front or behind without tapping either car. Clearly there were other variables at play here. There’s just no way that I could hit a parked vehicle [pretty damn hard] in a parking garage. I went through it over and over in my head. My jaw was on the steering wheel and I just stared at the damage.

I quickly looked to see if there were any witnesses. Obviously the passenger was a witness, but she could be trusted. I spotted another co-worker, who had observed my gorgeous parking job. “You did not just see that,” I commanded.

“No, but that was a damn fine parking job.”

I got out of my vehicle to survey the damage to the other. No license plate, and I could smell the new-car scent with all of its windows rolled up. After looking at it from as many angles as I could, I made two decisions:

1) I fucked the vehicle up real good.
2) I should do the right thing and put a note on the car saying something to the effect of, “I don’t know if you noticed, but your vehicle has been hit. I did it. I’m really sorry about it. Here’s my work number. Please call me when you get this.”

With my head bowed in shame and utter embarrassment I took the elevator to the office. I talked it over with a couple of co-workers to get their opinion.

“You did what?! Leave a note?! Are you crazy?!”

“That’s the right thing to do though. I mean if someone hit my car and didn’t leave a note I would be pretty pissed.”

“Yeah, but coooome on… Who gives a shit? Are you making enough money to pay for the damage? Are you making enough money for your insurance to go up? Think about these things very carefully and then go back down there and take the note OFF the vehicle.”

My co-worker had a good point, but before I took the note off the vehicle, I went to the parking office and told the parking manager what happened. If I wasnÌt going to leave a note, I would at least let the parking guy know what happened. It made sense at the time. The parking manager followed me to the site and said, “It’s not that bad. Let’s see whose vehicle it is.”

The building I worked in was in the middle of Beverly Hills. There were actor’s offices, talent agencies, modeling agencies, record companies and other Beverly Hills-type offices.

After some snooping with a flashlight the head of parking figured out who it belonged to. I removed the note and we went back to his office, looked up the owner’s name and he said, “Listen, this guy works for [name of company] and probably pulls in some bucks. I would just let it go. I’m not going to tell on you or anything.”

There had to be a catch. I looked at him for a few seconds, in silence, digesting what I just heard. He just smiled. Did he want money?

“What do I owe you?”

“Nothing. Don’t worry about it.”

“You’re sure?”

“Yeah.”

And I was out the door, note in-hand and back at my desk with nothing to worry about.

Flash forward to last Saturday. I parked my vehicle at a meter and ran across the street to grab some reading material at the newsstand and some dinner next door. I read my material and ate my dinner. I went back to my vehicle and noticed something was amiss. Someone had sideswiped my vehicle. No body damage, but certainly enough to notice. They didn’t bother leaving a note.

I felt vulnerable, violated and pissed as hell. How could someone sideswipe my vehicle and not leave a note? What an asshole! I stared at the damage, touched it and blurted out a few more kind words to the wind. I got in and on my way home I was reminded of the time I hit that person’s vehicle and didn’t leave a note. I felt kinda silly and laughed. Of course.