Keeping Track of New Music Releases With Some Help From MacStories

Federico had a nice post this week about how he keeps track of new music, which centers around the MusicHarbor app for iOS. Discovering new music is something I’ve really struggled with since music blogs largely went away. The streaming services simply are not optimizing for new music discovery, especially not the way I would like. While the tool is focused on Apple Music and has an integration with the service, I simply search for the releases in Spotify, which is my current streaming service of choice.

How I’m Using Twitter Now

Last night I decided to start tweeting again.

While I never really left Twitter completely, I largely took a break from it for the last 8 months. Last year I started being much more conscious of how I use technology and as part of that, unfollowed nearly everyone and stopped actively engaging with people on the platform. Having the distance gave me the space to think about if and how I might start using it again. So of course I made a list of rules for myself.

  1. Don’t open Twitter because you’re bored. As far as I’m concerned, the same goes for any social media app (or any other app) you open when you’re bored.
  2. Don’t keep Twitter open in a browser tab. This is like keeping Twitter on the home screen of your phone.
  3. Use Tweetbot on your iPhone and don’t place it on the home screen. Tweetbot is the best designed Twitter app you will find (for iOS), it has a chronological feed and is a pleasure to use.
  4. Tweet with positive purpose. Pretty self-explanatory. Don’t be a dick.
  5. Don’t overthink your tweets. Twitter was and is, at least to me, a platform well-suited for ephemera. I use TweetDelete.net to automatically delete my tweets after several days. I’ve seen tweets become a liability. True intent loses to perceived intent. No Thanks.
  6. Be open. Be Accessible. Leave your DMs open and respond to people, unless it’s the stalker salesperson that already emailed me and hit me up on LinkedIn.
  7. Don’t retweet often and never retweet without your own perspective or context. It’s easy to retweet and that’s by design. Use it sparingly. Use your own voice.
  8. Don’t follow a lot of people, especially people that retweet more than they tweet. Caveat: if someone is both interesting and is a habitual retweeter, turn off their retweets. I currently follow 137 people. That’s quite a few people and I should probably follow even fewer.
  9. Don’t follow people that talk a lot about themselves, news or politics. The exception here is when big, important news events are happening. I don’t need daily commentary on the news. I will go to trusted news publications for that if and when I want it.
  10. Use lists for people, topics or industries that you might want to read sometimes, but don’t want to show up in your main feed. The List feature is such a wonderful and under-utilized feature (because it’s hidden). Most of my lists are private, but I have many.

Special thanks to Patrick for a good, early morning exchange about Twitter in the Sonos office this morning. It helped me get more clear about some of my rules.

I was 10 years old in 1984. On April 1 of that year Marvin Gaye was shot by his own father. I remember it really hitting my dad hard, as a human being, a father and, of course, a fan. Marvin Gaye was one of the first voices I remember hearing in music. Incredible loss for us all.

We made it out to the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve today! Wasn’t as dramtic as ive seen in the past, but still so beautiful.

Micro.blog friends, I’m going to Seattle next week for work. I will have some non-work time. Tell me a single thing you recommend I do, place to eat or thing to see. Go!

Ozzie has his first ever bowl of Apple Jacks. We went to a birthday party the day before and instead of the usual goody bags, they had boxes of sugar cereal. Hope he enjoyed it because he probably won’t have them again for another 4 years. 😀

TFW you panic because it’s a few minutes past the hour and you swear you’re late for a meeting only to realize it’s a block you put on your own calendar to get things done.