We used to have a map of a frontier that could be anything. The web isn’t young anymore, though. It’s settled. It’s been prospected and picked through. Increasingly, it feels like we decided to pave the wilderness, turn it into a suburb, and build a mall. And I hate this map of the web, because it only describes a fraction of what it is and what’s possible. We’ve taken an opportunity for connection and distorted it to commodify attention. That’s one of the sleaziest things you can do.

A screen doesn’t care what it shows any more than a sheet of paper cares what’s printed on it. Screens are aesthetically neutral, so the looks of things are not a part of their grain. Sorry, internet. If you want to make something look flat, go for it. There are plenty of reasons to do so. But you shouldn’t say you made things look a certain way because the screen cared one way or the other.

What Screens Want by Frank Chimero

Finally getting around to reading this gem from the end of last year.

weandthecolor:

The Serif Hand, a handwritten font from La Goupil Paris

Fanny Coulez and Julien Saurin of La Goupil Paris are specialists for nice handwritten fonts. The Serif Hand is such a font that offers a natural hand drawn look.

Buy the Serif Hand font family on MyFonts.com

Check out more information about the The Serif Hand by La Goupil Paris or discover other recommended fonts on WE AND THE COLOR.

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Love this one.

matthewb:

A short film on Mike Langley, sign painter, for Vassilaros & Sons Coffee Co. From The Portland Egotist:

The attention to detail and steadiness of sign painting work blows our mind. You get that sense here in a very small dose, but if you have a chance be sure to check out Sign Painters because it will give you a respect and a healthy dose of inspiration for this unique section of the typographic fields.

(via John Boardley)

When I was a kid back in the ’70s and ’80s I was really into hi-fi systems. I couldn’t afford much gear, but I could borrow copies of The Absolute Sound and read them cover-to-cover. In those days the general wisdom was to buy an amplifier with way more power than you could possibly ever use, because it would sound great at low and normal volumes.

That wisdom stuck in my head, and I think it applies to software